Dots and Loops

liner notes and doodles in pop

Geike Arnaert covers The Shins

Remember that band Hooverphonic?  Well long-time frontwoman Geike Arnaert left the band in 2008 and has since released a solo album in 2011 and played a handful of dates.

Which brings us to this unlikely little curiosity, a lovely electronic cover of the Shins’ ”Simple Song.”  Check out the guy on the iPad.

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Confessions of a Michael Stipe

“It’s only been six months,” longtime R.E.M. frontman Michael Stipe says quietly. “So it’s really hard to even figure out who I am.” The 52-year-old is of course referring to life after his band, who — after three decades, 15 albums, and a meteoric rise from indie icons to mainstream superstars — announced they planned to “call it a day.”

“It’s pretty wild,” Stipe says. “I have this sensation that I’ve never felt … It’s kind of a newfound freedom.”

It was the end of an era, and not only for Stipe, but for anyone who’d grown up with REM. And yet, even as Stipe soul-searches, he is making some of the most creative work of his life. He’s got a studio in downtown Manhattan, where he is creating bronze sculptures of old cameras and cassette tapes. He’s producing a documentary about Internet fame. He (was) on Instagram, until a few weeks ago, when he proclaimed he did not want “any part” of Facebook “up in my grill.” And he has a crazy, beautiful, eccentric Tumblr — Confessions of a Michael Stipe — that he uses as a scrapbook to document it all. We sat down with Stipe at the Tumblr offices (among many giddy staffers) to get inside his head.

The new film from Whit Stillman Damsels in Distress is easily his weakest yet no less makes you see the world differently when you leave it.  That is, in  gauzy shades of pink, magenta, and hairspray.  A knowingly artificial, pleasing confection of 99 minutes that is somehow overlong.  Call it rust and cross your fingers we don’t have to wait another 20 years for another.

The new film from Whit Stillman Damsels in Distress is easily his weakest yet no less makes you see the world differently when you leave it. That is, in gauzy shades of pink, magenta, and hairspray. A knowingly artificial, pleasing confection of 99 minutes that is somehow overlong. Call it rust and cross your fingers we don’t have to wait another 20 years for another.

The Wake, “O Pamela” from their classic album Here Comes Everybody.  How did I not know about this before????  As my co-worker blithely put it, “What?! This is so good, it’s like better versions of every song in The Breakfast Club.

(Source: Spotify)